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Part XVIII: Energy and Activity : Feeding, Breathing and Activity Index

Respiration and Activity
Energy and Starvation
Chapter Summary (useful for revision)
Questions relating to this chapter

Topic Chapters Index

 

Activity Energy Used
/KJ per hour
Sitting 0080
Typing 0117
Dusting 0460
Walking 0774
Mining coal 1339
Rowing 1506
Cycling 1632
Swimming 1883
Running 3766

 

School children, Iquitos, Peru © Shirley Burchill

School children, Iquitos, Peru

 

Foods rich in sugars or starch

Amount of Energy
/KJ per gramme

Cornflakes 15,3
Bread 10,6
Chocolate 24,2
Foods rich in fats or oils

Amount of Energy
/KJ per gramme

Butter 31,2
Peanuts 24,5
Margarine 32,2
Foods rich in protein

Amount of Energy
/KJ per gramme

Eggs 06,6
Milk 02,7
Chicken 07,7

 

Chocolate bar distributer © Shirley Burchill

ENERGY AND ACTIVITY

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Feeding, Breathing and Activity

 

Energy and Activity © Shirley Burchill

 

The energy in food is used to carry out all the activities that keep an organism alive. For example: moving, keeping warm or sensing changes in the world around it.

The more active an animal or a plant is, the more energy it needs to stay alive.

Energy is measured in Joules or sometimes in calories. The table opposite shows how much energy a man uses when he is involved in different activities. You can see from this table that the activities that need the most effort also need most energy.

 

Energy in Food

 

Tucking into a burger and fries © Shirley Burchill

 

Animals obtain the energy that they need from the food that they eat and green plants make their energy-containing food using sunlight energy.

Fungi are non-green plants; they get their energy from the dead bodies that they decompose.

Therefore, in the living world there are two possible sources of energy: sunlight or the bodies of other organisms. The green plants which use sunlight energy are called autotrophs (this comes from the Greek words auto = self, and trophos = feeding). The animals and fungi which feed on other animals and plants are called heterotrophs (this is also from Greek words which mean feeding on others).

Not all the food in our diet contains the same amount of energy. Some foods are rich in energy because of the chemicals that they are made of. Foods which are rich in sugar, fat or protein contain a lot of energy. Opposite is a table which shows how much energy there is in foods which you may eat. You can see that the foods rich in fats and oils contain most energy.

 

 

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