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Revision Skills

History

French Fourth Republic Diagram
Questions and Answers
Decolonisation

Geography

Geography Glossary
French and English Terms

 

History and Geography Revision Index

Documents
Essays - Past Examples and Models
Links and References

 

 

Map

© Time Magazine 1950

 

Specific Subject Information and Revision Help

Tips on Studying History
IB and OI Grade History and Geography Revision
IB Biology
IB Physics
IB Math Studies

 

Documents

Don't forget, you can neither ignore the documents and treat the questions as if they were essay questions, NOR write document blah blah without writing History.

Remember the golden rules:

1)

Place the document(s) and give the context,

2)

Extract the INTERNAL evidence

3)

Add the EXTERNAL evidence needed to use the document(s)

4)

Establish the purpose and limitations of the document(s)

5)

Interpret the document(s).

When answering document questions, you should have done the above before you start your answer. Your answers should then be planned, making sure that a) you are answering the question and b) you are thinking about points 1-5.

Points 1,2,3 (especially), 4 & 5 ALL require your own knowledge. You can sometimes use the documents to support (or balance) each other.

 

 

IB AN OI HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY REVISION

Custom Search

Mr Bunch's Revision Guide (ongoing)

Don't forget: ENJOY REVISION. And don't forget King Alfred who conveniently discovered that the day has 24 hours and that if you divide it by three, it provides eight hours work, eight hours sleep and eight hours play. Funnily enough, that is more of each category than most of you get! For my part, I think if you all did four hours every day in the holidays (say 9 to 1) and then played, you will do well. On the other hand, King Alfred did have a point.......

Whatever you do, eat well, take some exercise.....and sleep properly

 

How should you revise?

i)

I think that the best form of revision is to write essay plans. In some ways this is suitable for both written and oral. In other words, take a question and develop an answer. This will make you look for the RELEVANT information and, because you looked for it (as opposed to stared at it), you will remember it much more easily. Don't forget that the new style of question has an old style essay at the end.

ii)

An essay plan takes a particular form, although you should always write your own and also develop an individual style.

 

a)

Essentially, you should think in terms of three to five paragraphs + an introduction. Leave the conclusion for the examination itself.

b)

The introduction can't be written until you know what you want to say. It must explain the question, set the context and indicate the lines of enquiry/answer you're going to make. It must sparkle.

c)

Each of the five paragraphs will deal with ONE point or argue in ONE area.

d)

Each paragraph in the PLAN will have a full sentence to start WHICH ANSWERS THE QUESTION. Often this includes reference to the previous paragraph (i,e, a link. In a simple form, it reads: 'Although Economic factors were obviously crucial, it was really the scandals involving ministers' private lives that brought down the government...or something like that). Number it. Leave a space. Then write the next main point...etc.

e)

Then go back and fill in the EVIDENCE, ARGUMENTS (sometimes including the objections) and EXPLANATIONS. These MUST be numbered or lettered.

a)

 

 

i)

 

ii)

b)

 

etc.

Why do it in this way? Because the numbering helps you see whether the information should be where it is. It also avoids cataloguing

 

How are the marks allocated?

16+ = Structured, fluent, understands question and the subject, has clearly read widely, good use of evidence, analyzes, argues a convincing case, sees more than one point of view, probably knows what various interpretations have been offered by historians, covers the subject. (Towards 7 in IB)

14+ = Structured, pretty fluent, understands question and the subject, good use of evidence, analyzes quite well, argues a reasonably convincing case, sees more than one point of view, covers most of the subject. (6 in IB)

12+ = Quite well structured, fairly well written, generally understands question, uses evidence, attempting to analyze & argue a case, not too much narrative, covers most of the subject. (5 in IB)

10+ = Fairly well written, more or less understands question, uses some evidence, quite a lot of narrative or description, covers some of the subject. (4 in IB)

 

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