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Rotational Dynamics
Consider the situation shown in the diagram below.   
     
  The force, F will provide a moment (or torque) given by   
     
     
  Assuming that there are no frictional (or other) forces opposing the motion of the wheel, the torque will cause the angular velocity of the wheel to change.    
     
  Experiments show that the rate of change of angular velocity is directly proportional to the torque  
   
Expressing this result as an equation we have    
     
where the Greek letter τ  is used to represent moment or torque  
The constant is called the moment of inertia of the wheel and axle and is given the symbol I so the equation is written  
 
   
Recall that the inertia of a body is a measure of its reluctance to change the state of its linear* motion.  
Similarly, the moment of inertia of a body is a measure of its reluctance to change the state of its angular (rotational) motion.  
   
*Elsewhere, we might have just said "change the state of its motion". Now we should be more specific.  
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