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The Electron Volt
The S.I. unit for energy is the Joule.  
1J is the quantity of work done (energy converted) when a force of 1N moves 1m in the direction of the force.  
This is a convenient unit for measuring quantities of energy in everyday situations; energy from food, energy for lighting heating etc.  
However, for the quantities of energy possessed by atoms and sub-atomic particles, it is inconveniently large.  
   
The electron Volt is a unit of work (or energy) much smaller than the Joule.  
   
Definition of the Electron-Volt  
1eV is the quantity of work done (energy converted) when 1 electron moves through a p.d. of 1V  
   
Now, 1V is equivalent to 1JC-1 which means that we can say that:  
1J is the quantity of work done (energy converted) when 1C of charge moves through a p.d. of 1V  
   
Comparing these two statements leads us to conclude that the J is about 61018 times as big as the eV as this is the number of electrons needed to have 1C of charge.  
   
Alternatively, we can say that 1eV is equal to 1.610-19J as the charge on one electron is 1.610-19C  
   
So, if you want to convert an energy in Joules to a number of eV  
 
 
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