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Mechanics
 
Aim: to investigate examples of Mechanical Oscillations
In all measurements of time period measure enough oscillations to give reasonably accurate results (20 or 30 should do in most cases).
Pendulum
Make a Simple Pendulum as shown below:
The time period of a pendulum is the time for one oscillation.
One oscillation is, for example, from A to B and back to A.
 
Find the time period of the pendulum under the following conditions.
  length, L mass, m initial amplitude, r
1. 30cm 20g (about) 2cm
2. 30cm 20g (about) 4cm
3. 30cm 50g  
4. 60cm    
 
Let the time period of pendulum 3 be T1 and that of pendulum 4 be T2
Calculate the ratio T2/T1
 
How does the time period of a pendulum depend on
- mass ?
- initial amplitude ?
- length ?
 
Mass/Spring Oscillator
Pull the mass down a short distance, r and release it (r is the initial amplitude of the oscillations).
 
Compare the time periods for initial amplitudes of r and 2r, masses of m and 2m.
Change the spring to a "stronger" or "weaker" one (one having a larger or smaller elastic constant).
 
How do these changes affect the time period of the mass/spring oscillator?
 
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