The Open Door Web Site
HOME PAGE BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY PHYSICS ELECTRONICS HISTORY HISTORY of SCI & TECH MATH STUDIES LEARN FRENCH STUDY GUIDE PHOTO GALLERY
ATOMIC and NUCLEAR ELECTRICITY and MAGNETISM MEASUREMENTS MECHANICS OPTICS PRACTICAL WORK QUESTIONS RELATIVITY THERMAL PHYSICS WAVES
PRACTICAL WORK
Google
Custom Search
Electricity and Magnetism
 
Aim: to investigate the behaviour of Resistors and to verify the formulae for calculating the Effective Value of Resistors connected in Series and in Parallel
See Resistance, Finding the Equivalent Resistance of a Circuit
 
Method
Obtain results from which you could plot graphs of voltage (horizontal) against current for (at least) two resistors separately and then for the same two resistors connected
i) in series and
ii) in parallel with each other.
Plot the graphs and use them to calculate the resistances, R1, R2 and Re1 (series) and Re2 (parallel).
 
A graph of voltage across a component against current flowing through the component is called the characteristic of the component.
To obtain the electrical characteristics of a component we need a variable voltage supply.
A simple way to produce a variable voltage supply from a fixed voltage supply is by using a rheostat (variable resistance) as a variable potential divider as shown in the circuit diagram below.
A variable potential divider circuit is useful in this and many other similar experiments but it should be noted that it is not a very stable voltage source.
To see this, try setting the sliding contact S to give a voltage of 3V with the resistor, R, removed from the circuit.
Now connect the resistor back in the circuit.
Notice that the reading of the voltmeter changes...
 
SITE MAP
WHAT'S NEW
ABOUT
PRIVACY
COPYRIGHT
SPONSORSHIP
DONATIONS
ADVERTISING
 

© The Open Door Team
2016
Any questions or
problems regarding
this site should be
addressed to
the webmaster

David Hoult 2017

Hosted By
Web Hosting by HostCentric

 
SiteLock
 
 
Practicals Index Page