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Thermal Physics
 
Aim: to measure the Specific Latent Heat of Vaporization of Water
See Specific Latent Heat
 
Method
It is usually found to be easier to measure the quantity of energy given out when steam condenses than to measure the quantity of energy needed to vaporize water.
The method suggested here consists of passing steam (assumed to be at 100C) through cold water where (most of) it will condense.
 
Set up apparatus as shown in the diagram below; it might be convenient to use rubber tubing for the delivery tube; be careful, it will get HOT!
Heat the water to boiling point and leave it boiling for a few minutes before putting the container of cold water in place (you want to add steam to the cold water, not hot water).
 
Before starting, write list of all the results you will need to take during the experiment.
It is a good idea to try to write the list in the order that you will take the results.
 
By measuring the temperature increase of the cold water, we can find the quantity of energy given out by the steam as it first condenses and then (as water) cools down to the final temperature of the (initially) cold water.
 
Use the principle of conservation of energy to establish an equation to calculate the value of the specific latent heat.
 
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